A Day in the Life at KSTR

Do you really want to know what goes on here on a day-to-day basis? We live in Costa Rica on a beautiful property with over 70 animals that have to be fed twice a day.

Our mornings start at 7am with the cleaning of all the cages and food containers and then we proceed at 8am with the chopping of all of the fruits and veggies for the AM feeding. Then we must make sure all of the animals are taken care of: sanctuary,rescue center and the animals in the clinic. Certain animals need meds, goats milk or nan milk formula before even getting their actual food. Then cage by cage we deliver the food to our monkeys, kinkajous, raccoons, birds, porcupines and a squirrel.

 

food prep          Volunteer Martie Stothoff prepping food in the monkey kitchen

038FYI…we no longer feed animals bread…just in case you were wondering!

Feeding normally takes about 1 hour and up to 1 1/2hrs. Sometimes the marmoset monkeys like to play try to get me by escaping during the food delivery!  During  the feedings we do a count to make sure all of the animals are accounted for, check for injuries and check for any holes in the cages so that there are no escapees aka MARMOSETS!

alex volunteerFood delivery by volunteer Alex Jimenez

Once the animals are fed, there’s always work to be done . Enriching the animal’s cages plays a huge part in keeping the animals engaged and healthy so they can enjoy living out there lives at our sanctuary. Our volunteers play a huge part in the daily care taking and without them it would make it very difficult to do.

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cage enrichment

cage enrichment 2Getting enrichment ready for the cages

 

lily and barb electrocuted monkey

electrocuted titiAt any given time we can get a injured animal and we have to be ready to treat them.

alexmanVolunteer Alex Jimenez helping to release a titi monkey

 When we’re not feeding the animals we try to squeeze in some clicker training, which will come in handy when we need to weigh,give  shots or exam the animals.

clicker trainingBarb Braman and Vet Tech Sam Trull clicker training spider monkeys Darwin and Nina

observationsAt times when we are introducing animals for the first time into a cage, volunteers  need to do observations to make sure no fighting is going on and everyone is getting along. Observations are very important because you can also find out which one is the dominant animal.

We also have daily tours to educate tourist about Kids Saving the Rainforest and the animals that we care for everyday.

barb talking about marmosetsBarb Braman educating a group about marmosets

Besides taking care of our animals we do get to do fun things like making our own cheese  and learning about gardening.

cheese3Seanna Daise and Carissa Ward making mozzarella cheese

chip explaining pineapple plantationFinca Owner Chip Braman discussing what should be planted next in the garden

Our day starts with feeding and ends with feeding with activities in between  and  at the end of the day we have happy healthy full belly animals.

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Although we do feedings everyday twice a day, everyday is alway a different experience and full of surprises! So feel free to follow  our blog or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kids-Saving-the-Rainforest/146280833519 or visit our website: http://kidssavingtherainforest.org

simonsquirrelPhoto courtesy of Primatography/Sam Trull

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One thought on “A Day in the Life at KSTR

  1. A Day in A Life is so right on because it truly is a day in a life of so many special animal friends that get their second chance in life because of KSTR. On my recent visit, there was an emergency operation for an ant-eater that had just arrived, and pretty much, you guys are a great contribution to a life EVERY DAY!

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