KSTR Thanksgiving Updates

KSTR has a lot to be thankful this year! 

We have been able to continue our mission of saving the rainforest and the wildlife in it a day at a time!  We want to thank those of you who have supported us through the years, and to give people visiting a chance to help too by taking a tour of our Sanctuary, where 100% of the proceeds go to the wildlife in our sanctuary.  See below for more information.

KSTR’s wildlife educational tour is growing by leaps and bounds.  The tour is from 9 to 12 Noon every day except Tuesdays.  You will get to see lots of wildlife that cannot be released back into the wild and you will have a view of a baby sloth eating breakfast behind the clinic windows.
After the tour you can shop in our store, eat a delicious snack and swim in a beautiful pool before heading out.  Transportation is included: Adults $60 Kids under 12, $45.  And the best news is that 100% of the proceeds go to feed, treat, and enrich the wildlife in the sanctuary!  So come out to the tour and help us to save the rainforest all at the same time!!  Contact Chip at chip@kstr.org or call 4033-0091

We also have great news for sloth lovers out there:

We have a new position for a volunteer/intern in our sloth nursery!  We have lots of baby sloths that need care!  It is a volunteer position so there is a fee of $800 per month for room and board at our beautiful location, http://www.bluebanyaninn.com, and we need someone for 6 months. This is a dream position so hurry up and apply!  There is no university in the world that could teach you what you will learn with us for a lot less money than a university!  Contact sam@kidssavingtherainforest.org for more information.

KSTR and The Sloth Institute (TSI) are helping to save more and more orphaned sloths and release them into the wild.  The release location is up and running at Tulemar! (Not open to the public)

America’s PBS (Public Broadcasting System) bought the rights to BBC1’s hit 2 part series featuring KSTR. It was shown in September to a very successful following.  It is called Nature’s Miracle Orphans, a Second Chance (You can find it here).

KSTR has received a very generous donation of land to reforest 45,000 trees. The land was a teak farm and KSTR will be reforesting with indigenous and fruit trees to provide a corridor for the squirrel monkeys as well as other wildlife.  The new rainforest will also have trees to provide them shelter, plus insects and fruit in the trees that they can eat.  KSTR will harvest the fruit to feed the wildlife in their care at our rescue center and sanctuary.   Finalization of the property transfer will be in April, which is the start of rainy season so it will be the perfect time to start planting saplings.

KSTR is in the process of creating an educational center to house more volunteers, interns, students, biologists, wildlife vets, and researchers. This is a very exciting project that will help save the rainforest in many new ways!

Have a very Happy Thanksgiving!

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Tales from the Wildlife Rescue Center

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Raising and Preparing a Kinkayou for a Life in the Wild
By Pia Martin DVM, KSTR Wildlife Vet

Kinkayous (Potos flavus) and in Spanish “Martillas”, are medium size mammals (40-55cms long, weighing 2-3kg), brownish colored from the Procyonid family. This means they are nocturnal, live in pairs or by themselves and are arboreal and terrestrial; just like raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coatis (Nasua narica). However, they have unique characteristics that make them very special in the rainforest. For example: although they are categorized as carnivores, they do not eat meat. Their diet is basically fruits, flowers, and rarely they will eat a bird’s egg or an insect. They have a 5 inch tongue that helps them get nectar from flowers making them pollinators. Their ankles and wrists can rotate more than most mammals helping them climb up and down trees and walk in branches easily. They also have a long prehensile tail that can wrap itself around a branch and hold on to most of the animal’s weight so it can hang and reach for a fruit in a lower branch.

They are endangered due to the loss of their habitat (deforestation, forest fragmentation, civilization), they were hunted for food in the past and also to use their coat as the bristles in paintbrushes. They are also caught and sold in the pet trade. Here in Manuel Antonio, kinkajous are common but difficult to observe since they only come out at night and stay mainly in the trees. Their main threats are electrocutions, being hit by cars, and attacks by dogs.

Last year we received a very small, furry animal with a huge head; small eyes and long tail. It was a newborn kinkajou found by a woman in Parrita who was walking towards her house and spotted him on the ground by himself. She gave him to MINAET and they brought him to us.

Raising a kinkajou is definitely a extraordinary situation. At first we had to syringe feed him formula with probiotics, and he slept all day and all night. As he was growing we changed to a bottle and started introducing fruits and veggies, and put him into a playpen with stuffed animals, branches, ropes, and live trees.

Now, that he feeds on his own, is very active at night, and he is starting to search for his independence, we are beginning to do a soft release. Every night, the animal caretaker and me, open his cage and let him come out. He follows us into the jungle, just like he would follow his mom. We are training him to explore the world, search for his food using his sense of smell, hide from predators or unknown noises and get away from people. We are letting him climb up very tall trees and develop strong muscles in his hind legs, forearms, and tail so that he will feel secure moving in the canopy of the trees. Every time he achieves a little challenge we give him a prize- a small piece of grape or really sweet mango. It is difficult since we have to do it at night and we are always looking out for snakes and also afraid that he might run away before he is ready and that we will not be able to catch him.

But for the time being, he is still used to us so he is not leaving yet; but when the time comes and he knows how to find food, shelter, and company, he will leave and follow his instinct. We just need to prepare him well to survive and reproduce in the rainforest, just as he was meant to be; free and happy.

Nature’s Miracle Orphans filmed by the BBC at KSTR

Back story of the filming of Nature’s Miracle Orphans
by Sam Trull, KSTR Wildlife Manager & Primatologist

After learning that KSTR was chosen as the Costa Rican Rescue Center to be featured in the BBC series, “Natures Miracle Orphans”, Hannah, one of our returning volunteers, and I literally ran screaming from the wildlife center and jumped fully-clothed into the pool, pausing only to remove our phones from our pockets. Somehow this gesture seemed like a perfect way to express our pure excitement about this wonderful opportunity; plus, let’s face it, we were really hot and sweaty because we live in the jungle. Read about BBC’s Nature’s Miracle Orphans Show airing mid-August

Ellen, Kermie and Pelota, 2 toed sloths: Pelota living completely outdoors with Kermie and Ellen and soon will be in the Pre-release enclosure. We're raising money for GPS collars, post release monitoring of all three.

With almost 8 weeks of filming, participating in this series was a huge time commitment. However, towards the end of it, I found myself wishing it wasn’t going to be over. It’s really difficult to put into words how much this experience meant to me and how life changing it has been in many ways.  The film crew was exceptional, was always respectful of the animals, and was a lot of fun to be around.  Each day was a new and interesting challenge trying to figure out the best way to tell the animal’s stories while making time to film real life events and emergencies as they happened.  At first, the process felt a little awkward having strangers around when it would normally be just a few of us taking care of the animals.  Eventually though, being followed around by the crew and cameras felt so natural that I started to forget how life was without them.  Every intimate moment, whether sad, happy, or scary, became a moment I wanted to share and felt privileged to be able to do so.  We welcomed the film crew as members of the KSTR family, and I truly felt invested in the final product of the show.  I always felt like this was a project we were creating together and that it was a fabulous way to let the world know what we are doing here in our corner of the rainforest in Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica.

There is no “average day” at KSTR and taking care of rescued wildlife, especially orphans, is a 24 hour commitment.   My life revolves around what the animals need and most days are filled with feeding and exercising babies, gathering wild foods, observations, medical exams, instructing volunteers and of course rescues and releases. The opportunity to share my passion with the world is rare and precious, and having the chance to invite a diverse audience to ride the same emotional roller coaster that I live on a daily basis is something I will always cherish.  I just hope that this series provides the audience with a new perspective on wildlife rescue.  It is my goal that we portray these animals not just as cute and cuddly creatures that exist solely for us to have and to hold, but instead that they are amazing creatures with wonderful stories of their own and that they all deserve another chance to be wild.

Newbie, a 3 toed sloth was at KSTR's rescue center during filming

 

Check out a video of a Baby Anteater learning to climb a branch!
Here’s one of Al the anteater feasting on some ants, go Al!

Read about Kids Saving the Rainforest’s other projects here.

KSTR featured on BBC One! Nature’s Miracle Orphans Costa Rica

Ellie Harrison and Max Hug Williams to present Nature’s Miracle Orphans for BBC One

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Presenters Ellie Harrison and Max Hug Williams follow the early lives of orphaned baby animals as they make their brave journeys back in to the wild, in a 2 x 60 minute series from the BBC’s award-winning Natural History Unit.

Filmed in Costa Rica and Australia, the series follows the teams and individuals who devote their lives to caring for young orphaned wildlife, teaching them the basic survival skills they need before they can be released back into the wild.

Wildlife cameraman Max Hug Williams visits Kids Saving the Rainforest in Costa Rica to meet the carers of a three-toed sloth named Newbie, who is battling a life-threatening illness. Max is also introduced to two-toed, two-day-old sloth Tiny, who is in need of constant care and attention, and anteater Al, who must learn to tackle aggressive biting ants if he is going to survive in the wild.

At Cape Otway Conservation Centre in Australia Ellie meets a tiny koala called Danny, who was found abandoned at the roadside after his mother was killed and ran up the leg of the motorist who stopped to rescue him. She’ll also visit Wildhaven Wildlife Shelter on the outskirts of Melbourne, where she’ll meet baby wallaby Neil and the carers working around the clock to teach the skills he’ll need for a life in the wild.

Max says: “Through the dedication of the amazing carers I met in Costa Rica, the animals that have had the hardest start in life are given the second chance they deserve. These incredible people have given up everything to nurture and care for these orphans 24/7 and having seen what they go through, I have to say, it must be one of the toughest jobs in the world.”

Ellie says: “Few jobs require as much personal sacrifice for no pay as rescuing and rehabilitating wildlife. The carers I have spent time with in Australia are woken through the night, convert their homes to rescue centres and have their personal schedule determined by the needs of the animals. But the reward is clear: a second chance for the orphans who would never have otherwise survived and the return of the animals they have nurtured back to the wild.”

Executive Producer Lucinda Axelsson says: “All the animals featured in the series are handpicked for their plucky personalities and their will to survive. It’s almost impossible not have your heart melted when you see Danny the baby koala being weighed in a little glass jug, or little Neil the orphaned wallaby trying hard to find a friend to cuddle up with. These babies are trying to survive against formidable odds and every survival truly feels like a miracle.”

Nature’s Miracle Orphans was commissioned for the BBC by Tom McDonald, Acting Head of Commissioning, Science and Natural History. The Executive Producer is Lucinda Axelsson and the series producer is Kate Broome, both for the BBC’s Natural History Unit.